Workplace Diversity

By Guy Higgins

I recently came across two articles. The first, Yes, your kid will do something with that philosophy degree after all, was a newspaper column that addressed the potential power of a classic liberal arts education. The second was condensed from McKinsey’s report on Women in the Workplace 2017 and looked at how women are faring in corporate careers. Continue reading

Disruption … Cognitive Diversity – What’s in the Middle?

By Guy Higgins

My noble editor sent me a link to an article, How To Identify The Most Dangerous Person In Your Company, recently. It’s a pretty good article and reminiscent of Robert Sutton’s book, The No Asshole Rule. The author discusses disruptive people – disruptive people are important today because they tend to introduce new ideas and changes. These are critical to organizations striving to stay relevant in a rapidly shifting world (you know, shift happens). The problem is that some people are disruptive and help the organization keep up with “the times,” but others are disruptive simply because they are jerks (Doctor Sutton’s “assholes”). Of course some people are both – jerks and sources of new ideas.

What is the relationship among people with these kinds of characteristics? Let’s take a look: Continue reading

Neurodiversity

By Guy Higgins

I recently read an article in the Harvard Business Review, Neurodiversity: The Benefits of Recruiting Employees with Cognitive Disabilities. I’ve posted on cognitive diversity (which the article does discuss – from the perspective of cognitive disabilities) before but had never considered this aspect of cognitive diversity, and I found the article to be very interesting. I also think that the work done in this area is only a small beginning and that there remains much to be learned. Continue reading

Doctor Martin Luther King Day – a Prospective

By Guy Higgins

Today, we honor the memory and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King. Almost fifty-three years ago, Dr. King stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and gave his I Have a Dream speech. If you haven’t listened to it or read it, I urge you to do so. You can find it here. The speech is certainly stirring, and Dr. King spoke of many injustices that needed to be righted. Many of those injustices have, for many people, been righted, but it is still a work in progress. However, I want to focus on one very small (albeit oft quoted) part of that speech.

Dr. King proclaimed, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Continue reading

Diversity in the Workplace

By Guy Higgins

important information. The post is titled Workplace Diversity Policies ‘Don’t Help. Mr. Moyer references a study done by Tessa L. Dover, Cheryl R. Kaiser and Brenda Major in which they conclude that in terms of increasing “demographic diversity”… corporate diversity policies don’t increase the representation of minorities and women (i.e. they don’t work). They also conclude that such policies may be counterproductive in that they can, “1) blind white men to racism and sexism at work and 2) lead to resentment.” In the first case, if the organization has implemented a diversity policy, then “the problem is solved,” and I, as a leader, don’t have to focus on diversity. In the second case, adhering to diversity policies may result in the perception (and sometimes the reality) that less qualified people have been hired or promoted because of their demographic identity, it should come as no surprise that the policies may be creating resentment and are proving to be ineffective. Continue reading